Gin

Gin is a distilled alcoholic beverage that stems its predominant flavor from juniper berries. Gin arose as a medicinal liquor produced by monks and alchemists over Europe, especially in southern France, Flanders, and the Netherlands, to provide aqua vita from distillates of grapes and grains. It then became an object of business in the spirits business.

Gin today is produced in different ways from herbal ingredients, giving rise to several distinct styles and brands. After juniper, gin tends to be flavored with botanical/herbal, spice, floral, or fruit flavors or often a combination. It is consumed mixed with tonic water in a gin and tonic. Gin is also often used as a base spirit to produce flavored, gin-based liqueurs, for example, sloe gin, traditionally made by the addition of fruit, flavorings, and sugar.

The name gin is an abbreviated form of the older English word genever, related to the French word genièvre and the Dutch word jenever. All ultimately derive from Juniperus, the Latin for juniper.

Gin is also great with

3 minutes
Tuxedo

The Tuxedo is composed of gin, dry Vermouth, orange bitters, maraschino and Absinthe. It's very similar to the imperial cocktail, which adds maraschino to the combination of gin and dry vermouth. Related to the martini, the Tuxedo has had many variations since its inception in the 1880s. The cocktail is named after the Tuxedo Club in Orange County, New York where it was first mixed.

3 minutes
Pink gin

Pink gin is a gin-based cocktail that appeared in England in the mid-19th century. It's made with Plymouth Gin which has 57 percent alcohol by volume and a dash of Angostura bitters. The dark red bitters make the whole beverage pinkish. A lemon twist is also generally used as a garnish, to subtly complement the flavor with the citrus oils. Pink gin is believed to have been created by members of the Royal Navy. This type of gin, Plymouth gin is much sweeter as opposed to London gin which is dry.

5 minutes
Gin sour

The gin sour is a classic cocktail made with gin, lemon juice, and sugar that predates Prohibition in the United States. Adding club soda water to the mix turns it into a gin fizz. The egg white is optional but adds a beautiful layer of foamy texture atop the drink, which you can then decorate with bitters. Usually 2-3 drops of Angostura bitters. This sour is light, refreshing, and with a lot of character, one of the original cocktails of its kind appreciated in a similar manner since the late 1800s.

3 minutes
Blackthorn

The Blackthorn is a sloe gin-based cocktail that emerged in the early 20th century. The blackthorn is the name for Prunus spinosa, the plant whose fruit is called sloes. Those fruits are infused in gin to create sloe gin, from where the cocktail name. The name Blackthorn was assigned to many cocktails, all of which are using sloe gin as their base. The cocktail is tasty and intriguing, with sweet, savory, and spicy hints of cloves and cinnamon.

3 minutes
Casino

The Casino is an IBA official cocktail made with gin, maraschino liqueur, orange bitters and fresh lemon juice. The Casino, which appeared in Harry Craddock's 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book, falls into a category of cocktails called Daisies. Each of these drinks includes a spirit, citrus, and a flavored sweetener.

3 minutes
Dry Martini

The martini is a cocktail made with gin and vermouth, and garnished with an olive or a lemon twist. A dry martini is made with little to no vermouth. Ordering a martini "extra dry" will result in even less or no vermouth added. By the Roaring Twenties, it became a common drink order. Over the course of the 20th century, the amount of vermouth steadily dropped.

3 minutes
Vesper

The Vesper or Vesper Martini is a cocktail that was originally made of gin, vodka, and Kina Lillet. In a cocktail shaker, combine gin, vodka, and Lillet Blanc or dry vermouth. The formulations of its ingredients have changed over time. The Vesper was made famous by James Bond. The drink was invented and named by Ian Fleming in the 1953 James Bond novel Casino Royale.

3 minutes
Paradise

The combination of gin and apricot brandy was quite common in the early days of the cocktail. It's a pleasant taste because the brandy adds a sweet fruit contrast against the gin's botanical flavoring and drier profile. The orange juice complements both of those, bridging the gap and adding a bright citrus touch that is very enjoyable. The earliest known in-print recipe for the Paradise Cocktail was written by Harry Craddock in 1930.