Rye whiskey

In the U.S, rye whiskey is, by law, obtained from a mixture of at least 51 percent rye. The extra ingredients in the mash are corn and malted barley. It is distilled to no more than 160 U.S. proof and aged in charred, new oak barrels. Rye whiskey that has been aged for at least two years and not mixed with other spirits named as straight, as in straight rye whiskey.

Rye is a key ingredient n many popular cocktails like Old Fashioned, Sazerac, or Manhattan. Rye can also be paired with club soda or ginger ale, or drunk straight, neat, or on the rocks.

Rye whiskey is also great with

3 minutes
Vieux Carre

The Vieux Carré is an IBA official cocktail made with rye whiskey, cognac, sweet vermouth liqueur, Bénédictine, and Peychaud's bitters. The cocktail is a slightly sweet, spiced, and warming drink with herbal, citrus, and smoky notes. The recipe was first stirred to life during the 1930s by Walter Bergeron, a bartender at New Orleans Carousel Bar.

3 minutes
Trinidad Sour

The Trinidad Sour is a cocktail made with Angostura bitters, orgeat syrup(a sweet nut-based syrup), lemon juice, and rye whiskey. The orgeat, lemon juice helps balance the herbal intensity of the bitters, making the Trinidad Sour a delight. The cocktail recipe was invented by Las Vegas bartender Giuseppe Gonzalez.

4 minutes
Sazerac

The Sazerac is a local variation of a cognac or whiskey cocktail originally from New Orleans, named for the Sazerac de Forge et Fils brand of cognac brandy. The drink is most traditionally a combination of cognac or rye whiskey, absinthe, Peychaud's Bitters, and sugar. The cocktail, which is a close cousin to the Old Fashioned, has been kicking around in one form or another since as early as 1838 and was trademarked in 1900 by Sazerac Co.

3 minutes
New York Sour

The New York Sour is a cocktail similar to the whiskey sour, but it adds a float of dry red wine to the drink. The New York Sour is one of those cocktails that is relatively simple to execute, yet looks impressive and tastes complex. The Whiskey Sour comes from the mid-19th century and is believed to have first appeared in print in the 1862 edition of the famed "Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide."