Simple syrup

Inverted sugar syrup, also known as simple syrup, is a basic sugar-and-water syrup used by bartenders as a sweetener to make cocktails. The syrup is obtained by dissolving sugar in water. Simple syrup spreads sweetness evenly throughout liquids of any temperature, making it a critical component of numerous iced drinks and cocktails (like a martini or a whiskey sour).

Syrups are made by melting sugar in water or by decreasing naturally sweet juices such as cane juice, maple sap, sorghum juice, or agave nectar. Corn syrup is produced from corn starch using an enzymatic process that transforms it into sugars.

Simple syrup is also great with

3 minutes
New York Sour

The New York Sour is a cocktail similar to the whiskey sour, but it adds a float of dry red wine to the drink. The New York Sour is one of those cocktails that is relatively simple to execute, yet looks impressive and tastes complex. The Whiskey Sour comes from the mid-19th century and is believed to have first appeared in print in the 1862 edition of the famed "Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide."

3 minutes
French 75

French 75 is a cocktail made from gin, champagne, lemon juice, and sugar. It is also called a 75 Cocktail, or in French simply a Soixante Quinze. The drink dates to World War I, and an early form was created in 1915 at the New York Bar in Paris—later Harry's New York Bar—by barman Harry MacElhone. The combination was said to have such a kick that it felt like being shelled with the powerful French 75mm field gun.

5 minutes
Brandy Crusta

The cocktail features brandy, dry curaçao, maraschino liqueur, lemon juice, simple syrup and Angostura bitters with a sugar rim and lemon twist garnish. This recipe, to be used at the new New Orleans bar Jewel of the South, is not very far removed from the one first printed by the bartender Jerry Thomas in his seminal 1862 cocktail manual.

4 minutes
Illegal

The Illegal cocktail is a new addition to the list of IBA standardized cocktails. A boozy mix of Mezcal, Rum, Maraschino liqueur, and a few more ingredients. It's a unique mix of bold flavors that brings sunshine to your mind, even on rainy days. This cocktail celebrates summer, sunshine, and beaches. It’s boozy, smoky, tart, and refreshing.

4 minutes
Gimlet

The gimlet is a cocktail made with gin, lime juice, and simple syrup. The modern tastes are less sweet and typically use for up to four parts gin to one part of lime juice and simple syrup. The name of the cocktail is unclear. It may be named after the tool for digging small holes or after the surgeon Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Gimlette, who is said to have first added lime cordial to gin to help fight the ravages of scurvy on long trips.

3 minutes
South Side

A South Side or Southside is an alcoholic beverage made with gin, lime juice, simple syrup and mint. A variant, the Southside Fizz, adds soda water. Its origins are subject to speculation but the recipe can be traced back to at least 1916, when it appeared in Huge Enslinn’s book "Recipes for Mixed Drinks" as the South Side Fizz. The drink may have been the preferred beverage of Al Capone.

4 minutes
Singapore Sling

The Singapore Sling is a gin-based sling cocktail from Singapore developed sometimes before 1915. The earliest published version of the recipe appeared in "The Savoy Cocktail Book", a 1930 classic written by Harry Craddock. It was initially called the gin sling – a sling was originally a North American drink composed of spirit and water, sweetened and flavored.

4 minutes
Pisco Sour

A pisco sour is an alcoholic cocktail of Peruvian origin that is typical of the cuisines from Peru and Chile. The drink's name comes from pisco, which is its base liquor, and the cocktail term sour, in reference to sour citrus juice and sweetener components. The cocktail as it is known today was invented in the early 1920s in Lima, the capital of Peru, by the American bartender Victor Vaughen Morris.