Orange juice

Orange juice is a fluid extract of the orange tree fruit obtained by squeezing or reaming oranges. It comes in different varieties, including blood orange, navel oranges, valencia orange, and clementine.

The origin of the orange traces back to Florida in the late 1920s. Until then, orange juice was more of a luxury, something experienced seasonally and freshly squeezed.

Citrus fruits usually contain unique volatile essential oils. Their flavor is refreshing and pleasant, which can help relieve stress and nervousness, especially for women. Some say that the orange color on a restaurant menu can stimulate people's appetite.

Orange juice is also great with

2 minutes
Mimosa

A mimosa cocktail is composed of champagne (or other sparkling wine) and chilled citrus juice, usually orange juice unless otherwise specified. It is traditionally served in a tall champagne flute at brunch, at weddings, or as part of business or first class service on some passenger railways and airlines. The Mimosa was created around 1925 and named for a yellow-flowered plant.

3 minutes
Bronx

The Bronx is a cocktail with a unique balance of sweet, tart, botanical and boozy. It is a Perfect Martini with orange juice added and equal parts sweet and dry vermouth. It was ranked number three in "The World's 10 Most Famous Cocktails in 1934" after the Martini and the Manhattan. As with other mixed drinks invented before prohibition in the United States, more than multiple stories attributed to the invention of this cocktail.

4 minutes
Yellow Bird

The Yellow Bird is a common tropical cocktails that uses both light rum and dark rum in combination with lime and orange juice. Another ingredient, the Galliano (anise and vanilla liqueur) is added to bring in another layer of flavor and make things a bit more interesting. The origins of the yellow bird name is unclear. Some sources mention that the cocktail was named after the Haitian tune "Yellow Bird".

3 minutes
Paradise

The combination of gin and apricot brandy was quite common in the early days of the cocktail. It's a pleasant taste because the brandy adds a sweet fruit contrast against the gin's botanical flavoring and drier profile. The orange juice complements both of those, bridging the gap and adding a bright citrus touch that is very enjoyable. The earliest known in-print recipe for the Paradise Cocktail was written by Harry Craddock in 1930.

3 minutes
Damn the Weather

A Damn the Weather is a Prohibition-Era cocktail made with Gin, sweet vermouth, orange juice, and a sweetener like Triple Sec or Curaçao. It is served shaken and chilled, often with a slice of orange or other citrus fruit. The cocktail was invented to hide the scent and flavor of poor-quality homemade spirits, like bathtub gin. The original recipe was added in the Harry Craddock's 1930 The Savoy Cocktail Book.

3 minutes
Sex on the Beach

A Sex on the Beach is an alcoholic cocktail containing vodka, peach schnapps, orange juice and cranberry juice. The drink is built over ice in a highball glass and garnished with an orange slice. Sometimes they are mixed in smaller amounts and served as a shot. The origin is uncertain, many suggest the cocktail may have been invented when a bartender combined a Fuzzy Navel (peach schnapps and orange juice) with a Cape Codder (vodka and cranberry juice).

3 minutes
Tequila sunrise

The tequila sunrise is a cocktail made of tequila, orange juice, and grenadine syrup. It's served unmixed in a tall glass. The cocktail is named for its appearance when served—with gradations of color resembling a sunrise. The original tequila sunrise contained tequila, creme de cassis, lime juice, and soda water, and was served at the Arizona Biltmore Hotel where it was created by Gene Sulit in the 1930s or 1940s.

3 minutes
Monkey Gland

The sweetened combination of gin, orange juice, grenadine and the dash of absinthe makes a really nice drink. The Monkey Gland was created in the 1920s by Harry MacElhone, owner of Harry's New York Bar in Paris, France. Most recipes for the monkey gland suggest adding a splash of absinthe or one of its many substitutes to the shaker to create a nice fruity cocktail.